Last edited by Fezshura
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of Timber-culture laws. found in the catalog.

Timber-culture laws.

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands

Timber-culture laws.

by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands

  • 156 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lumber trade

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesAmending timber-culture laws
    SeriesH.rp.1637
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination1 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18261375M

    The Timber Culture Act; The Desert Land Act; None of these laws were instrumental to spurring westward migration to the Great Plains during that period. All of these laws were instrumental to spurring westward migration to the Great Plains during that period. 3. When was the first American transcontinental railroad finished? ; ;   The original grant of May, , was in title passed from the United States and vested in the state of Iowa on Octo , when the map of definite location was lodged in the General Land Office, and the right of the company then attached.

    Start studying Chapter 5 Reading Questions. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. What is the title of the book by Rachel Carson that refers to the absence of birdsongs due to the poisoning of birds by pesticides? -the Timber Culture Act-the Homestead Act. the Superfund. The American settler's guide a popular exposition of the public land system on the United States of America / by Henry N. Copp. Volume: () (Reprint) by Copp, Henry N. (Henry Norris), and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at

    Together With The Forms And Instructions For Making Application: Also The Revised Statutes Relative To Soldiers’ Homesteads, &c., And Subsequent Land Laws. Third Edition, (Washington, DC: J.H. Soulé, Publisher, ), 29 pp. SAHRL Rare Book Collection, RARE / / S   The Homestead Act accelerated settlement of U.S. western territory by allowing any American, including freed slaves, to put in a claim for up to free acres of federal land.


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Timber-culture laws by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Timber Culture Act was a follow-up act to the Homestead Timber Culture Act was passed by Congress in The act allowed homesteaders to get another acres (65 ha) of land if they planted trees on Timber-culture laws.

book of the land, because the land was "almost one entire plain of grass, which is and ever must be useless to cultivating man."Enacted by: the 42nd United States Congress.

The General Revision Act (sometimes Land Revision Act) of was a Federal legislation initiative signed in under the Presidential Administration of Benjamin General Revision Act of reversed previous policy initiatives, such as the Timber Culture Act of Timber-culture laws. book, in which land fraud was readily accessible on the behalf of wealthy individuals and arters: Sidney R.

Yates Building. Though the Timber Culture law was a failure, it offered farmers and ranchers the advantage of a little more land for a few years.

Wold’s Grove InNels H. Wold, an immigrant from Norway, filed a claim under the Timber Culture Act. The Forest Reserve Act of is a law that gives the President of the United States the authority to unilaterally set aside forest reserves from land in the public domain.

After newspapers began to publicize the fraud and speculation under the previous Timber Culture Act of that granted additional land to homesteaders agreeing to plant trees, scientists of the American Association for Long title: An Act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other put.

Circular From The General Land Office, Showing The Manner Of Proceeding To Obtain Title To Public Lands Under The Pre-Emption, Homestead, Timber Culture, And Other Laws. Issued September 1, [FACSIMILE] [United States. General Land Office] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. HIGH QUALITY FACSIMILE REPRODUCTION: United : United States.

General Land Office. Book/Printed Material Circular from the General land office, showing the manner of proceeding to obtain title to public lands under the pre-emption, pre-emption, homestead, timber culture, and other laws. Issued October 1, Nieder, Paul. "The Timber Culture Laws in Western Kansas, " Master's thesis, University of Kansas, Opie, John.

The Law of the Land: Two Hundred Years of American Farmland Policy. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, Williams, Burton J. "Trees But No Timber: Prelude to the Timber Culture Act.".

12 UNITED STATES FOREST POLICY and from Gifford Pinchot, William L. Hall, and Herbert A. Smith, regarding the work of the Forest Service.

Thanks are due particularly to Editor Herbert A. Smith of the Forest Service for a careful read. Congress passes "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes", known as the Forest Reserve Act, repealing the Timber Culture Act of and empowering the President to create "forest reserves" (later known as national forests) by withdrawing land from the public domain; this creates the legislative foundation for what became.

It repealed several Acts, including the Timber Culture Act of and all pre-emption laws. [The Timber Culture Act granted a homesteader a patent to acres of land in the Great Plains if he agreed to plant 1/4 of land in trees. This was later changed to eliminate tree planting provision.].

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Circular from the General Land Office, showing the manner of proceeding to obtain title to public lands under the pre-emption, homestead, timber culture, and other laws by,Govt.

Print. the timberlands and water for irrigation purposes. The repeal of the Timber-Culture Act of was outlined in the first section; stating, “That this repeal shall not affect any valid rights heretofore accrued or accruing under said laws, but all bona fide 11Ibid.

12Nelson, Robert H. Public Lands and Private Rights: The Failure of Scientific. The laws allowed settlers to acquire up to 1, acres when used in conjunction with the Preemption and Homestead Laws.

Timber Culture and Desert Land Law in Operation: Proving up—successfully patenting lands—under the Timber Culture and Desert Land Laws, however, was difficult. Timber Culture Act Ma The Timber Culture Act of was another law that encouraged homesteading and the planting of trees in the west.

If a settler planted 40 acres of timber (reduced to 10 acres in ) and fostered their growth for 10 years, the. Circular From the General Land Office: Showing the Manner of Proceeding to Obtain Title to Public Lands Under the Preemption, Homestead, Timber Culture, and Other Laws (Classic Reprint) [United States General Land Office] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Excerpt from Circular From the General Land Office: Showing the Manner of Proceeding to Obtain Title to Public Lands. On Januworkers were pulling pipe out of a freshly drilled oil well off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, when a torrent of gassy, gray mud shot out with a deafening roar, showering the men with slime.

Unable to plug the hole, they activated a device that crushed the pipe and sealed off the well. The blowout seemed over—until bubbles of gas started roiling the water nearby. The laws extending the homestead, pre-emption, timber culture, and desert land entry privileges make bona fide settlement or improvement of the land a condition precedent to obtaining title.

The United States Government does not offer at public sale any of. Critics pointed to the ease with which speculators used the Timber Culture Act to acquire land as a major deficiency, and the act was later repealed in Another complement to homesteading laws that applied to the semi-arid central and eastern parts of Washington.

General Land Office: Circular from the General Land Office, showing the manner of proceeding to obtain title to public lands under the pre-emption, homestead. Trees under Timber Culture Act not considered improvement. Valuation of land containing artesian well. Repealed. Exemption from taxation of personal property not centrally assessed--Taxes or fees in lieu unimpaired.

The Fugitive Slave Acts were two federal laws that concerned runaway slaves in the United States. The two acts were passed in and in They required federal involvement in catching runaway slaves in Northern States.

The laws were designed to protect Southern slave owners. They required those states and jurisdictions to help in the capture and delivery of fugitive slaves.(Record Group 49) (bulk ) OVERVIEW OF RECORDS LOCATIONS Table of Contents ADMINISTRATIVE HISTORY GENERAL RECORDS OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE AND THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Correspondence Records relating to lands administration Other records RECORDS OF OPERATING .Title (Main title): Kansas Homesteading and the Timber Culture Act of Scope and Content Scope and content: Nine pages of photocopied affidavits, testimony, and correspondence related to Hamilton County homesteaders' compliance with the Timber .